Piedmont Residence by Moller Architecture

An existing house was deconstructed to make room for 7200 SF of new ground up construction including a main house, pool house, and lanai.  This hillside home was built through a phased sequence of extensive excavation and site work, complicated by a single point of entry.   Site walls were built using true dry stacked stone and concrete retaining walls faced with sawn veneer.  Sustainable features include FSC certified lumber, solar hot water, fly ash concrete, and low emitting insulation with 75% recycled content.

Type: Residential
Program: 5 Bedrooms, 7 Bathrooms, Den, Pool House, Lanai
Size: 7000 sqft
Architect: Moller Architecture
Photographer: Mariko Reed
Source: Matpelbuilders

Flavor Paper HQ by Skylab Architecture

Flavor Paper HQ, a boutique wallpaper manufacturer located in Brooklyn, NY by Jeff Kovel of Skylab Architecture. Portland firm Skylab Architecture designed the renovation of a 1931 brick building to house the new headquarters for Flavor Paper.
Sherman, CEO of Flavor Paper and a couple of employee-tenants actually live there, with the boss enjoying a classic bachelor lifestyle (D.J. booth, roof deck, floating beds) inside a retro-futuristic penthouse with the city’s easiest commute.

100% Chocolate Cafe by Wonderwall

Interior designer Masamichi Katayama of Wonderwall Studio has designed the 100% Chocolate Cafe in Tokyo, Japan.

Project description
100% Chocolate Cafe. opened its second shop at Tokyo Solamachi, located in the new Tokyo landmark, Tokyo Sky Tree. The café features an open kitchen where visitors can watch the process of sweets being made through a display of glazed boxes containing ingredients of 56 different types of chocolate, creating a tempting atmosphere of a “chocolate kitchen” similar to the first 100% Chocolate Cafe. in Kyobashi. This second café has an in-store goods shop and takeout counter just outside the café. The systematical display of sweets and a variety of original items are combined with an easy-to-view, easy-to-buy layout, enhancing the overall accessibility.

Design: Wonderwall
Photography: Nacasa & Partners

Winged House by K2LD Architects

K2LD Architects have designed the Winged House in Singapore.
A private family residence situated on a uniquely shaped triangular plot, the Winged House frames the site with two prominent forms – the trapeziums. These forms open towards the main view at the back of the site where 3 existing majestic palms are, and of lush greenery. These embracing forms carve out and frame a middle garden for friendly and private gatherings. In response to the tropical climate context, the formal exploration took a turn from cutting openings from a pure trapezoid form to separating roof from form. The extensive roof overhangs for naturally ventilated spaces, are enjoyed with much shelter and shade even during the seasonal heavy rain downpours.

An exploration of the roof form went further with the separation of roof from roof. This split of the roof achieved a play of light and shadows into the interior space. Spaces such as the double volume Dining room, the 2nd storey passageway and the large Patio are all celebrated with the overlapping split roof and its light play. This slot is further enhanced at night with concealed light fittings illuminating the split. Materiality is key to strengthening the relationship of the two winged forms, its space in-between and roof on roof.

In the intermediate space between two forms is the main entrance foyer and Living room which is flanked with two feature natural split granite walls, contrasting its heavy presence with the lightness of the roofs and vertical timber lines of the house. Timber is extensively used throughout the house, choosing a lighter colour timber (Burmese Teak) for the underside of the roofs versus the darker wood (Chengai) as the infill medium (ie: the sun-shading screens) to create a play of depth of the façade. The vertical timber screens not only help in providing shade from the harsh sun, but it helps blend the house with the lush vertical tree trunks of the surrounding greenery. The Winged House, in its formal expressions and material language, results in an abode that sits snugly in its context in a quiet ‘winged’ embrace of the site and dwelling within.

Architecture: K2LD Architects